FAQ - Posting Location Info

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BobH

Administrator
Staff member
#1
How much location info should you post? This can be a tricky subject among photographers. Some are happy to share every location they've found, while others are more protective of "their" spots. Many of us learned about our favorite locations from others, and wish to "pay it forward" to the next generation of photographers.

However, in some cases, it's best not to share specific information, a frequent example when a rare and jittery bird shows up in a strange place, it can be best to let them have their privacy.

We don't take sides on this issue. You're not required to share any information at all. We do respectfully request that when applicable, you share at least some location information. This can be as vague or specific as you'd like "Taken on the Mosquito Lake Bridge at Deming, WA" or "Taken along the Nooksack River in the North Cascades" both let people know at least the general location of your image. The second allows you to keep details to yourself, while still giving folks a clue as to what region. If you're really feeling protective, you could say "Taken in the North Cascades" which would still identify the area while certainly being vague enough to keep your secret spot a secret.

The choice is up to you.
 

Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
#2
I use a lot of discretion in posting locations of bird photos after the incident a few years ago involving long-eared owls at Eide Road.
 

BobH

Administrator
Staff member
#3
I use a lot of discretion in posting locations of bird photos after the incident a few years ago involving long-eared owls at Eide Road.
Birders in general are getting a lot more tight lipped and that's fine. Again, you have a couple options. You can post the photo and give only vague location info, or none at all for that matter. You can also choose to wait a few months before posting, knowing the bird will be long gone by then.

The intent here is not to aid in people harassing wildlife or trampling popular locations. The goal is to give folks an idea of where to find good photos in general. It's a lot less risky to tell folks about Kerry Park than it is to let them know about a rare bird in a fragile location.
 


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