Parkscapes

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Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
#83
My fascination with the marsh at winter continued on Valentine's Day (2-14-18).

5DIII + 24-105L wide angle zoom.
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1Dx + 100-400L II telephoto zoom.
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Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
#85
Thursday (2-15-18) was grim and gloomy, so I tried to brighten things up with the HDR settings of my 5DIII + 24-105L wide angle zoom.

Art Bold is a little too bright.
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Art Standard creates a different effect without looking like a 60's acid trip.
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Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
#86
I bought a new/used 16-35L wide angle zoom from Kenmore Camera. Photos from my old 17-35L wide angle zoom were very soft on the edges. I took the following shots Wednesday (3-7-18) at the marsh with the new/used lens set at 16mm using my 7DII. I think the edges look good.

These two were taken handheld in M mode using the camera's HDR feature. Settings = 1/250, f/16, auto ISO.

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These two were taken handheld in M mode without HDR. Settings = 1/125, f/16, auto ISO.

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The 16-35L zoom works well with the crop-framed 7D and 7DII while the 24-105L works well with the full framed 5DIII and 1Dx.
I am going to try the following setups for awhile: 5DIII + 500L telephoto + 1.4x teleconverter, 1Dx + 100-400L II telephoto zoom, and 7DII + 16-35L wide angle zoom.
 
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Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
#87
Saturday (3-9-18) was sunny and a better day to take photos with my new/used 16-35L wide angle zoom. All photos were taken at 16mm at f/16.

Looking south from the #4 viewing platform with the 5D Mark III (full frame sensor).

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Looking west from the #3 viewing platform the 7D Mark II (crop frame sensor).

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Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
#88
What a difference a day can make. It rained most of Thursday (3/22/18), but cleared up in time (courtesy of a cold wind from the south) for the World Water Day tour of the marsh put on by the Sierra Club.

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The following day (Friday, 3-23-18) started out with snow followed by sunbreaks (a Seattle weather term) between passing squalls of rain, hale, and sleet. It stopped snowing when I arrived at the marsh, but storm clouds were quite literally on the horizon. I took a few photos but packed it up when raindrops started to fall, followed by hail.

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Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
#89
Spring is here and soon the deciduous trees that border the marsh will be leafing out into various shades of green, although there are a few coniferous trees that remain green year round.

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Backgrounds of orange and brown will soon change to green.

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Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
#90
I have spent much time over the past several years photographing wildlife at the Edmonds marsh. Information on the marsh copied from the Bird Fest website:
The Edmonds Marsh is one of the few urban saltwater estuaries remaining in the Puget Sound area. Before settlement this salt marsh occupied nearly 40 acres of barrier estuary and marsh complex, a rare geologic and biologically rich coastal ecosytem. Development reduced the marsh to its present area of 22.5 acres, which is now being restored and preserved for wildlife habitat, water quality and public enjoyment.

When I first started photographing the marsh, the marsh side of the paved walkway between the #2 (main) and #4 (eastern) viewing platforms was a series of blackberry brambles. EarthCorps and the Puget Sound Stewards, a volunteer group that works with EarthCorps, removed the brambles and replaced them with native plants under a grant from the Hazel Miller Foundation. The City of Edmonds has since provided some funding and contracted with EarthCorps to keep supporting the program. The stewards continue working in the marsh, as well as many other parks in Edmonds.

Students from the Students Saving Salmon program at Edmonds-Woodway and Meadowdale High Schools work with volunteer Joe Scordino on monitoring the water quality of the marsh and the two creeks that feed it.

The Edmonds City Council has established a fund to help support restoration and preservation of the marsh. Anyone wishing to make a tax deductible contribution to the Marsh fund can submit a check designated for the Marsh Restoration Fund to the City of Edmonds, 121 5th Ave. N., Edmonds, WA 98020, attention Carrie Hite.

This is what it looks like today (4-2-18) just east of the #2 platform.

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Where you now see native plants was once blackberry brambles.
 
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Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
#93
Continuing east towards the #4 viewing platform. Notice the piles of sticks and brush. These were left as habitat for insects and ground dwelling birds.

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Thanks to everyone who has helped with the various marsh restoration projects.
 
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Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
#94
I took these shots Thursday afternoon (4-12-18) from my usual location at the #2 (Main) viewing platform. The trees that surround the marsh are leafing out and new cattail shoots are poking their way up through last year's dead vegetation.

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Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
#95
Fifty Shades of Green could be the title of these shots of the marsh taken Friday (6-29-18). Several of us have noticed that the foliage at the marsh is much more lush than in years past. Some of our photo view angles have been blocked due to the plant growth.

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Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
#96
I have asked some knowledgeable individuals why there has been the sudden, explosive growth of foliage at the marsh this year. The answers can be summarized as it is probably just the right combination of rain + sunshine at strategic times this spring.
 


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