Wildlife of Edmonds, WA. 2016

Affiliate Disclosure: We may receive a commision from some of the links and ads shown on this website (Learn More Here)


Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
Continued from previous page.

Herons demand their personal space. When they get too close to one another, fights can occur. I always look for one to break out when a heron flies in and lands within a group at the marsh.

06.jpg 07.jpg

08.jpg 09.jpg

10.jpg
 
Last edited:

Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
One heron left, but the action continued among the remaining birds.

11.jpg 12.jpg

13.jpg 14.jpg

15.jpg

Disclaimer: No herons were hurt during the filming of this fight scene. ;)
 
Last edited:

Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
The avian action started early Friday morning (12-9-16) on my back deck. I had taken the hummer feeders inside for the night to keep them from freezing. It snowed Thursday night/Friday morning and the hummers were anxious for me to hang the feeders back outside. After I did, three hummers began fighting over them.
01.jpg

02.jpg
 
Last edited:

Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
After lunch Terry and I went to the fishing pier. A common murre came in fairly close and offered the opportunity to photograph it diving. It is interesting to observe the diving techniques of the various birds that fish by the fishing pier.

07.jpg

08.jpg

09.jpg

10.jpg

11.jpg
 

Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
Western grebes continue to be present as well as a red-necked grebe. Two swam side-by-side for comparison.
Left: western. Right: red-necked.
12.jpg

A female kingfisher had been perching on the rail just a few feet away while we were sitting in one of the new shelters. We startled it when we stood up and it flew to the breakwater.
13.jpg

Snow shots at Brackett's Landing north.
Golden-crowned sparrow.
14.jpg

My nemesis, the ruby-crowned kinglet.
15.jpg

A black scoter off Sunset Ave.
16.jpg
 
Last edited:

Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
It's not easy being an alpha male hummer. Dexter, my backyard hummer. spent much of Wednesday (12-14-16) defending "his" feeders on my back deck.
IMG_0001.jpg

IMG_0002.jpg

IMG_0003.jpg

IMG_0004.jpg

IMG_0005.jpg

The primary intruder appeared to be a female. The action got very intense shortly before sunset as the temperature dropped below freezing and both birds wanted to fill up before settling in for the night. I hate to see the two hummers fighting over two feeders as they are expending energy that could be put to better use. I may relocate one of the feeders to the front of the house to cut down on the skirmishes.
 

Terry O

Active Member
I doubt moving a feeder to the front of the house will make any difference, Bill. We have a feeder in front and in back - the hummers still have skirmishes front and back....nature of the beast :)
Terry
 

Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
You got a kinglet! I need to go find some gold-crowns...
Guess what I found Thursday (12/15)? I had just pulled in to the parking lot of Deer Creek Park in Woodway when I saw a golden-crowned kinglet working a nearby tree. The photos are not as good as I had hoped as it was very dark in the shade and kinglets never stand still.

IMG_0001.jpg

IMG_0002.jpg

IMG_0003.jpg

IMG_0005.jpg
 

Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
The hummer wars continue to rage on my back deck. Friday (12/16) I positioned myself to photograph the action. Dexter, the alpha Anna's male that has claimed my feeders, employed two strategies to fend off the two females. One strategy is to perch on the feeder and drive away the approaching females. Sometimes he didn't need to leave the feeder, he would just raise his wings and screech.

The second strategy is to perch on a nearby branch with a view of the feeders. From this position he would swoop down on the females after they landed on the feeders. This offered the best opportunity for photos, as I would just focus on the perched female and keep snapping as I waited for Dexter to swoop in. Sometimes his screeching or the buzz from his wings would give me a brief advanced warning.

The two females developed their own tag team strategy for dealing with Dexter. While Dexter was chasing one of them away from the feeder, the other one would fly in for a drink before Dexter returned.

Dexter on the lookout for the two females.
IMG_0001.jpg

One of the females flew in for a drink.
IMG_0002.jpg

Dexter swooped in to chase her off.
IMG_0003.jpg

IMG_0004.jpg
 
Last edited:

Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
The two females would share the two feeders or even share the same feeder.
IMG_0005.jpg

IMG_0006.jpg

IMG_0007.jpg

Dexter wanted no part of this "kumbaya" moment and flew in to break it up.
IMG_0008.jpg

Another example of Dexter chasing off one of the females.
IMG_0009.jpg
 

Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
Saturday afternoon (12/17/16) Dexter had to contend with brief snow flurries as well as the cold. I have been bringing the feeders inside at night to keep them from freezing.

IMG_0001.jpg

IMG_0002.jpg

IMG_0003.jpg

IMG_0004.jpg
 

Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
It was cold Sunday morning (12-18-16) as this female Anna's hummingbird was drinking from one of feeders. I have been bringing the feeders inside at night to keep them from freezing.

Focus on the hummer.
IMG_0001.jpg

Focus on the thermometer.
IMG_0002.jpg

Focus on the wall halfway between the hummer and the thermometer.
IMG_0003.jpg
 
Last edited:

Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
Thursday morning (12-22-16) one of the female Anna's hummers hid atop a shrub in my backyard.
IMG_0001.jpg

Once she was convinced Dexter had not spotted here, she flew up to the feeders on my back deck for some long undisturbed drinks of sugar water.
IMG_0002.jpg

She was cold and hungry enough to let me get fairly close without flying off.
IMG_0003.jpg

IMG_0004.jpg
 
Last edited:


PNWPhotos.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com