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Thread: Wildlife of Edmonds, WA. 2017

  1. #91
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    From Friday (5/12).

    A marbled murrelet was off the south end of the fishing pier. It disappeared shortly after I took some photos of it.
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    A duckling and a northern flicker in Pine Ridge Park.
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    Last year volunteers installed five nest boxes at the marsh for tree swallows. A pair of violet-green swallows has been building a nest in the box off the #2 viewing platform, but a pair of tree swallows has laid claim to the box off the #3 platform.
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    Last edited by Bill Anderson; 05-13-2017 at 07:39 AM.
    Bill Anderson; Edmonds (near Seattle), WA.

  2. #92
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    I got a call Friday morning that a pileated woodpecker and barred owl were in close proximity to one another in Pine Ridge Park. My son and I walked over as it is not far from our house.

    Two Douglas' squirrels were chasing each other on the edge of the park. I got a photo of one.
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    Male pileated woodpecker.
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    Owl and woodpecker.
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    The woodpecker worked trees fairly close to the owl.
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    A pair of hairy woodpeckers have a burrow near the service road. Both parents were making food deliveries into the burrow.
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    Bill Anderson; Edmonds (near Seattle), WA.

  3. #93
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    I returned to the park later in the afternoon with a fellow member of the Bird Fest committee that I ran into at the fishing pier. The Pacific wren is often heard but seldom seen in Pine Ridge Park, but she spotted one and its burrow. The bird would enter the burrow from the bottom and exit through the top.

    Photography was made difficult by the forest canopy and concurrent lack of light, which caused high ISO settings even at 1/500 and f/5.6.
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    The noise from the high ISO settings discouraged closeups and close crops. These wider views look better.
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    Last edited by Bill Anderson; 05-14-2017 at 03:35 PM.
    Bill Anderson; Edmonds (near Seattle), WA.

  4. #94
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    Shots from Tuesday (5/16).

    An interesting assortment of birds was at the tethered of the underwater dive park at Brackett's Landing.
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    An interesting assortment of LBB's (little bitty birds) was at the marsh.
    A western wood peewee caught and ate a bee. It was eventually run off by a swallow.
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    A pair of tree swallows provided some avian porn.
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    To which a barn swallow showed a passing interest.
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    Last edited by Bill Anderson; 05-18-2017 at 11:01 AM.
    Bill Anderson; Edmonds (near Seattle), WA.

  5. #95
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    "Documentation" shot of a common yellowthroat.
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    Bushtits. The male has black eyes while the female has spooky yellow eyes.
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    At least three Wilson's warblers were in trees and bushes around the #2 viewing platform.
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    I finished the day back at Brackett's Landing where several Caspian terns were cruising over the water.
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    Bill Anderson; Edmonds (near Seattle), WA.

  6. #96
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    Wednesday afternoon (5/17) my son and I were driving down a street near our house when we saw a pileated woodpecker in a tree beside the street. The woodpecker took off and flew down the street ahead of our pickup. We followed it to a tree on a side street and got a few shots before it took off again. This location is only about a block from Yost Park as the pileated flies, so it may be the female of the Yost Park pair.
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    Bill Anderson; Edmonds (near Seattle), WA.

  7. #97

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    Nice bird photography.
    Keith Owen

  8. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by youngwarrior View Post
    Nice bird photography.
    Thanks. Birds are probably the easiest wildlife to find and photograph in an urban environment.
    Last edited by Bill Anderson; 05-19-2017 at 08:06 AM.
    Bill Anderson; Edmonds (near Seattle), WA.

  9. #99
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    Marsh wrens are still busy serenading and building nests at the Edmonds marsh.
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    The nests are easiest to spot when they are new as the grass blades are still wet and dark green, which makes them stand out from last year's dead reeds and cattails. There is a limited viewing window as new spring growth will eventually hide the nests. One enterprising individual has built three nests off the #1 viewing platform.

    Wednesday (5/17) I was watching as he picked wet grass blades off the floor of the marsh and draped them over the stalks of the reeds. It was much the same way someone would dip strips of old newspaper in water to make paper mache and drape them around a wire frame to make a pinata or miniature mountains for a model railroad. Look closely to see the well-disguised wren in these photos.

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    Last edited by Bill Anderson; 05-19-2017 at 08:55 AM.
    Bill Anderson; Edmonds (near Seattle), WA.

  10. #100
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    Thursday afternoon (5/18) a black-capped chickadee was digging through cattail heads to find and eat the larvae that live inside. Taken with the 5DIII + 500L + 1.4x TC, tripod mounted.

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    In these two photos you can see a larva in the bird's bill.
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    I tried to capture the floating fuzz that the bird dislodged as it dug through the cattail.
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    Last edited by Bill Anderson; 05-19-2017 at 08:14 AM.
    Bill Anderson; Edmonds (near Seattle), WA.

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