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Thread: Wldlife of Edmonds, WA. 2014

  1. #11
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    A few from Friday (1/3). With the tidal gate shut for the winter, the marsh is just a mudflat. The only action is Wesley and his friends chasing each other around the #1 viewing platform.

    Friday was the closest I have come to catching one hummer buzzing another in a "J" dive. In the lower right corner is a hummer perched on the tree. In the upper left corner is the hummer which had just buzzed it. I focused on the perched hummer and fired away hoping I would get something. My 5D Mk III has a rapid fire rate of six frames/sec. With the good light, I should have been using my 7D, which has a rapid fire rate of eight frames/sec.
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    A small flock of red-breasted mergansers was off Olympic Beach.
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    Male.
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    Female.
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    The marina's resident female belted kingfisher was resting quietly at one of her favorite perches. She made no noise and I would not have seen her if I did not know where to look.
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    Last edited by Bill Anderson; 01-04-2014 at 02:21 AM.
    Bill Anderson; Edmonds (near Seattle), WA.

  2. #12
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    Woodway, Washington
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    You are the master of those hummer flight shots, Bill!

  3. #13
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    Saturday (1/4) was very sunny. I had no favorites in the Wild Card round of the NFL playoffs, so I made the rounds of the marsh and fishing pier prior to my son's basketball practice. With the tide gate shut and coyote sightings few and far between, Wesley and his buddies continue to be the only action at the marsh. Even the resident herons seemed to have abandoned the place.

    I was so "focused" on photographing this hummer...
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    that I did not see a second hummer perched nearby (and out of focus) until I downloaded the photos to my computer at home.
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    The hummers continue to perch very close to the #1 viewing platform, which makes for some very good shots. You just have to be careful about the low winter's sun reflecting directly off their sides and over-exposing the shots.
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    Last edited by Bill Anderson; 01-04-2014 at 11:30 PM.
    Bill Anderson; Edmonds (near Seattle), WA.

  4. #14
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    The marina's resident female belted kingfisher perched on the railing of the walkway out to the fishing pier.
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    Some people were approaching, so I set up for her departure.
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    She is flying in silent stealth mode these days without her usual loud chatter.
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    A rhinoceros auklet made an appearance directly below the fishing pier.
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    I got a "butt shot" as it dove. The low winter's sun reflected directly off the white under feathers and played havoc with the exposure settings.
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    Last edited by Bill Anderson; 01-04-2014 at 11:34 PM.
    Bill Anderson; Edmonds (near Seattle), WA.

  5. #15
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    I saw some people on the walkway to the fishing pier looking down at something inside the marina. It was a cormorant a swimming underwater. I think this is the first time I have seen a cormorant inside the marina. These are all basically grab shots. The low winter sun is quite a challenge when photographing rapidly moving birds, as you don't have time to change the settings. I wonder if these photos would have come out better had I used my circular polarizing filter.

    Under water.
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    The cormorant is surfacing. Everything below the base of the neck is still under water.
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    Surfaced.
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    Last edited by Bill Anderson; 01-04-2014 at 11:29 PM.
    Bill Anderson; Edmonds (near Seattle), WA.

  6. #16
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    Some really unusual shots, Bill. Not so sure the polarizer would have helped - besides, no time to put it on anyways

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terry O View Post
    Some really unusual shots, Bill. Not so sure the polarizer would have helped - besides, no time to put it on anyways
    I had it in my pocket. Using hindsight, I should have put it on after my shots of the kingfisher.
    Bill Anderson; Edmonds (near Seattle), WA.

  8. #18
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    Prof. John M. Marzluff, a wildlife biologist at the University of Washington, has demonstrated that the evil minions of the Dark Lord recognize faces.
    http://www.nytimes.com/2008/08/26/sc...row.html/?_r=0

    I have been photographing the Point Edwards bald eagle pair for the past 4-5 years. I often wonder if they recognize me when my big lens and I show up to take their photos. Sometimes it seems that way when one of them looks at me.
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    Last edited by Bill Anderson; 01-05-2014 at 12:48 AM.
    Bill Anderson; Edmonds (near Seattle), WA.

  9. #19
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    I suspect they do recognize you Bill....

  10. #20
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    Monday 1/6: Continuing Terry's Waterbirds of the Edmonds Waterfront thread. http://www.pnwphotos.com/forum/showt...nds-Waterfront

    The gull dropped the crab on the beach. I title this series, When Lunch Fights Back. The crab put up a brave fight, but we all know how it ended. Such is the Circle of Life.
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    We ran into our birder friend "Young" Dave on the fishing pier, where we saw an out of the ordinary bird waaaaaaaay off the pier. I thought it was a long-tailed duck, Terry thought it was a scaup. I think Terry was correct.
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    Terry had to return home after lunch. Dave, my son Daren, and I went to Yost Park to look for the resident barred owl pair. I led our avian trio to the northeast corner of the park, which I believe is the owls' winter roosting area due to the heavy canopy of Doug firs that hides them from the evil minions of the Dark Lord.

    Dave spotted one owl perched on a branch where it was very, very, very dark. My camera settings to take the shot without a flash were insane.
    5D Mk III + 5.6/100-400L telephoto zoom, 1/125, f/5.6, ISO 51200.
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    I had the noise reduction setting at high. The 5DIII handles high ISO settings fairly well as long as you don't have to crop. Fortunately, the barred owls will let you get very close as long as they are up in a tree above you.
    Last edited by Bill Anderson; 01-29-2014 at 01:50 AM.
    Bill Anderson; Edmonds (near Seattle), WA.

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