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Thread: Wldlife of Edmonds, WA. 2014

  1. #21
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    Great follow up to my gull post, Bill! Love that crab fighting back scene . And that 5diii really does an amazing job at those high ISOs! Young Dave is a fantastic spotter, wish I could have been with you.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terry O View Post
    Great follow up to my gull post, Bill! Love that crab fighting back scene . And that 5diii really does an amazing job at those high ISOs! Young Dave is a fantastic spotter, wish I could have been with you.
    You know how that works. If you had been with us, we would not have spotted the owl.
    Bill Anderson; Edmonds (near Seattle), WA.

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    love the great Eagle photo... that crab is saying 'please dont eat me!"

  4. #24
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    Photographing barred owls presents somewhat of a quandary. Since the owls are nocturnal, my best shots are taken before sunset when they are still sleeping. While the lighting may be satisfactory, the photos all tend to look alike as a sleeping owl is a sleeping owl.

    I prefer action shots, but barred owls are night hunters. My few shots of the owls in flight were taken with very high ISO settings and very low shutter speeds, which results in very poor photos.
    Last edited by Bill Anderson; 01-09-2014 at 12:00 AM.
    Bill Anderson; Edmonds (near Seattle), WA.

  5. #25
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    A lone black scoter was in the Sound below Sunset Ave. on Wednesday (1/8).
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    With the tidal gate shut, the only source of water for the marsh is rainfall and Shellbarger and Willow Creeks. The dry autumn and winter reduced the marsh to mudflats with the resident herons fleeing elsewhere to find food. The rain of the past two days has caused the water level to rise a little which brought back the herons.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Last edited by Bill Anderson; 01-08-2014 at 11:58 PM.
    Bill Anderson; Edmonds (near Seattle), WA.

  6. #26
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    Glad there was something to shoot, Bill. BTW, I missed another opportunity to capture a shot of the coyote in our pasture - that darned mode wheel got turned to Av (f16) - needless to say, the images came out a 'little' blurred! Its either spring for the $$ to get the lock installed or buy a 5Diii

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terry O View Post
    that darned mode wheel got turned to Av (f16) - needless to say, the images came out a 'little' blurred! Its either spring for the $$ to get the lock installed or buy a 5Diii
    Well, I'd say go for the 5Diii and be done with it.

    OK, there is a cheaper option. You're aware of a problem that occurs on a regular basis, get into the habit of checking for it. Take a few test shots. When looking through the viewfinder, take a quick peek at the shutter speed, ISO an aperture. That alone will tell you everything you need to know. Shooting at 1/15th of a second? Well, if you're shooting hand held, and photographing a fast moving coyote, it's probably not going to end well unless you're doing something special like panning.

    There's not a photographer out there that hasn't blown a shot due to bad settings. Last weekend the first dozen or so of my eagle shots were over-exposed to the point the head feathers lost all detail. I "chimp" when shooting, not obsessively (at least in my opinion) but I do check and keep checking until I feel I'm getting the results I want. I quickly determined I was blowing out the details and adjusted accordingly.

    You'll probably still blow shots no matter what you do. I know I still do. After going on the night shoot that Arline organized, my first shot the next day was ever so slightly over exposed. (a 10 second exposure in broad daylight will do that...) Ideally, you'll put the camera back to it's default settings at the end of the day. Good practice, but we all forget from time to time. That's why you should also check it when you pick it up. Oh, and if your camera has the option, set it so it will NOT let you take a photo without a memory card. On Nikon, you disable "demo" mode, or something along those lines. That will save you some grief as well.
    Bob Harbison
    PNWphotos.com Host

    “You don’t take a photograph, you make it.” -Ansel Adams

  8. #28
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    Thanks for the advice, Bob. All perfectly true. Unfortunately there are times when split seconds are involved to capture the shot - in this case running from the dining room to the office and back and taking the shot with zero time for anything but pushing the shutter....can't win them all and this case would have been super lucky to get it....but no cigar!

  9. #29
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    Terry, that happens. The "gotta shoot now" thing makes you rush. Last weekend, I watched about a dozen trumpeter swans fly directly over a group of photographers. I was stuck on the other side of the road. Two minutes earlier and I'd have had the chance for a great shot.
    As you said, nobody gets them all!
    Bob Harbison
    PNWphotos.com Host

    “You don’t take a photograph, you make it.” -Ansel Adams

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobH View Post
    Terry, that happens. The "gotta shoot now" thing makes you rush. Last weekend, I watched about a dozen trumpeter swans fly directly over a group of photographers. I was stuck on the other side of the road. Two minutes earlier and I'd have had the chance for a great shot.
    As you said, nobody gets them all!
    Photographers have a lot in common with fishermen. We always talking about the ones that "got away."
    Last edited by Bill Anderson; 01-09-2014 at 05:12 PM.
    Bill Anderson; Edmonds (near Seattle), WA.

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