Wildlife of Edmonds, WA. 2015

Affiliate Disclosure: We may receive a commision from some of the links and ads shown on this website (Learn More Here)


Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
Tuesday (4/21) turned cold, windy, and overcast. A flock of least(?) sandpipers + a lone dunlin in breeding plumage was at the marsh.
01.JPG

02.JPG

The dunlin was noticeably larger than the sandpipers.
03.JPG


A Brandt's cormorant was swimming by the fishing pier.
04.JPG

A flock of Brant flew past the pier.
05.JPG
 
Last edited:

Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
Wednesday (4/22) was another busy birding day. First stop after lunch with Terry was the Willow Creek fish hatchery. I got a shot of a my first of the year orange-crowned warbler while I was waiting for Terry.
01.JPG

A pair of red-tailed hawks were circling above the hatchery while we were photographing a pair of red-breasted sapsuckers at their burrow.
02.JPG

03.JPG

ATL (After Terry Left) I went down to the marina. Several pigeon guillemots were in the water below the fishing pier. All but one were in the adult breeding plumage.
05.JPG

This one was not in full breeding plumage, which is rather unusual for this time of the year.
04.JPG
 

Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
More ATL. Wesley, the male Anna's hummer who guards the #1 viewing platform of the marsh, made some very close strafes above his nemesis, one of the neighboring song sparrows. He worked up quite an appetite, so he went gnat hunting afterwards.

01.JPG

02.JPG

03.JPG

04.JPG
 

Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
The highlight of the day was photographing the pair of red-breasted sapsuckers which have dug a a burrow in the tall spar at the fish hatchery. Terry and I met there after lunch and set up our super telephoto combos: 5DIII + 500L + 1.4x teleconverter. It was difficult to find good shooting angles due to the uneven terrain and leaves around the burrow.

At one point one of the sapsuckers flew down and landed on the log directly in front of us. It was too close to photograph with our super telephoto combos, but I had brought my 7D + 100-400L zoom for such an emergency.
01.JPG

02.JPG

03.JPG

Here are some shots of the two sapsuckers together taken with the 5DIII + 500L + 1.4x teleconverter.
04.JPG

05.JPG

Terry should have some more shots of the woodpecker in the burrow.
 

Terry O

Active Member
More Sapsucker views

It was a worthwhile wait for the pair of Red-breasted Sapsuckers to show up! Here are a few more images.

After a bit of a wait, she/he finally stuck her head out....

4-22-2015 red-breasted sapsucker hatchery_5837.JPG

One of the pair flew down to the the burnt tree root ball within about 15 or so feet from me, I was just barely able to get a focus with the 700mm combination 500 f4L and 1.4x extender (4.5m). I am guessing that I will never again see a Red-breasted Sapsucker this close to me again :) At one point it flew and landed no more than 5 feet from me and seemed totally unconcerned about my presence. All I could to is just watch and enjoy the experience. These shots are only minor crops.

4-22-2015 red-breasted sapsucker hatchery_5950.JPG

4-22-2015 red-breasted sapsucker hatchery_5957.JPG

4-22-2015 red-breasted sapsucker hatchery_5965.JPG

4-22-2015 red-breasted sapsucker hatchery_5967.JPG
 

Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
Thursday morning (4/23) was cool and overcast, so I went down to the marsh looking for sandpipers. I was hoping that the lack of sunshine and heat would not create the glare and heat waves of the previous sunny days. A flock of about 25 western sandpipers was one of the few mudflats above water.

5DIII + 500L telephoto + 2x teleconverter, tripod mounted.
01.JPG

02.JPG

03.JPG

04.JPG

05.JPG
 

Terry O

Active Member
Considering the great distances involved, Bill, those shots of the sandpipers are quite good. And great job on the hummers - your capture of the action shots amaze me.
 
Last edited:

Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
Thursday I bought Canon's new series II 100-400L telephoto zoom and a series III 1.4x teleconverter to go with it. I will use this combo with my 5DIII for my "walk & stalk" photo shoots and let Daren use my old 100-400L with the 7D.

Here are some photos of Wesley taken Friday afternoon (6/24) with my new lens + telecoverter. Wesley is always eager to pose.

01.JPG

02.JPG

03.JPG

04.JPG

05.JPG
 
Last edited:

Terry O

Active Member
These look very good, Bill! I hope you enjoy it as much as I think you will. I am also excited that Daren has the interest and capabilities to use your other 100-400. I look forward to seeing more of his work!
 

squirl033

Super Moderator
Staff member
shore birds at the marsh

talked to Bill briefly yesterday, he mentioned that someone had reported large numbers of shore birds at the marsh, and wondered if i'd seen them. i stopped by there after my visit with the pileateds at Pine Ridge, and sure enough, there was a flock of little mottled birds out pecking away at the mud. there were probably 50 or 60 of them scattered across the mudflats.
the tide was out, so they were easily visible. have no idea what they are - shore birds are far from my specialty... sandpipers or plovers of some variety, i suspect. anyway, here there are...

IMG_4278.JPG

IMG_4282.JPG

here's a shot of the flock in flight... sorry for the crappy focus - i'd been using spot focus to shoot them on the ground, and didn't have time to change when they took off...

IMG_4286.jpg
 

Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
If those sandpipers had yellow legs, they were least sandpipers. If they had black legs, they were western sandpipers. Distinguishing the leg color is not as easy as it seems if the birds are wading in the black mud.
 

squirl033

Super Moderator
Staff member
yeah... i think they're yellow, though... if you look at the second image, the second bird back from the front, his leg looks quite yellow...
 

Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
There was no one celebrating Cinco de Mayo on a rainy Tuesday afternoon at the #1 viewing platform of the marsh other than Wesley and I.

01.JPG

Wesley did his version of a flamenco dance.
02.JPG

03.JPG

04.JPG

I think he appreciated my company as he perched fairly close to me.
05.JPG
 

Bill Anderson

Super Moderator
Staff member
Thursday (5/7) after lunch, Terry, Daren, and I found a small flock of six least sandpipers in the mudflat off the #1 viewing platform of the marsh. This is the spot where we were photographing snipes last month and the closest we have seen sandpipers to date.

01.JPG

02.JPG

Even this close, we were still having problems with heat waves coming off the mud. Close cropping is to be avoided.
03.JPG

Least sandpipers are incredibly tiny when viewed up close with the naked eye. They the smallest shorebird, no larger than a song sparrow.
04.JPG

Daren and I returned to the marsh in the late afternoon. The sandpipers had moved out to the large mudflat in the middle of the marsh.
05.JPG

Continued.
 
Last edited:


PNWPhotos.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com

Top